Why Do Cats Wiggle Their Tails? The Answer Might Surprise You!

Make no mistakes, felines are very expressive creatures! Let’s look at the burning question — why do cats wiggle their tails so much?

why do cats wiggle their tails
blhphotography / Flickr

When your kitty is just wandering around the home, you may notice that they do something strange. Often enough, cats will bend and move their tails in quite peculiar ways. You may well have wondered why do cats wiggle their tails. It’s a good question, but one with a complicated answer.

The truth of the matter is that cats tend to use their tail as a way of communicating with one another and, indeed, us. What that means is that we need to pay close attention to how cats move their tails if we want to understand what each movement means. Here are some of the messages they may well be trying to send out. Here’s what you need to know.

Why do cats wiggle their tails?

They are ‘peacocking’
Sign: Elevated tail

This technique is particularly common among male cats when they are trying to attract a lovely female feline. The idea is that the cat makes themselves look as big as possible so that they will seem to be the worthiest mate. You will likely find that your cat elevates their tail to an extremely high position to do so.

They are feeling anxious
Sign: Bushed up tail

Of course, no pet owner wants their cat to feel anxious but it happens from time to time. One of the major signs you will see when this happens is a thoroughly bushy tail. This is when a cat is feeling distressed. They feel that they are under attack or the like. That means that they will likely want to defend themselves. Making the tail appear larger than it is is a sign to predators to back off.

They are about to hunt
Sign: Tail down

When your kitty is in hunting mode, being sneaky is everything. One of the main things that cats do is try to make themselves as small as possible. You may find that their tail is low to the ground — as are they. This helps the feline to hide away and sneak up on prey. Watch out! When your kitty is ready to pounce, you don’t want to be in their way.

They are super happy
Sign: Bent tail

From time to time, your cat will be super happy. One of the things that you will notice when they are content is a slightly bent tail. The tip of their tail is likely to be bent over a tad, but the rest of the tail should be straight. If you see this sign, your kitty is in a great mood. Time for some cuddles.

Open-Plan Living Is Bad For Your Cat, According To Animal Expert

It may be the epitome of modern design, but open-plan living is bad for your cat. One expert explains just why this is a problem for your pet.

open-plan living is bad for your cat
Robert Tortorelli / Flickr

These days, many people opt for the ultra modern open-plan look in their homes. This minimal style is super popular these days and looks incredible. Still, when you’re designing your home, do you consider the needs of your pet? The truth of the matter may be that open-plan living is bad for your cat. Here’s what you need to know.

Animal experts recently spoke out about just this issue at an Animal Welfare Foundation seminar based in London, UK. The core idea was that open-plan homes mean extreme socialization for our cats. While that may not sound like such a bad thing at first, it could cause your pet to become anxious.

“While we may consider we are one big family, with our husbands and wives and our children, those cats might not consider those other cats or dogs as part of their same social group,” explained Sarah Ellis, of International Cat Care, at the seminar.

The fact that open-plan designs don’t allow for much privacy is the crux of the issue. You see, felines tend to prefer time alone. Unlike humans, they are not particularly social animals, spending much of their time in isolation or hunting by themselves. In an open living environment, though, there’s not much space for them to have some alone time.

That means that our cats can get seriously stressed out when forced to be around people or, indeed, other animals for too long. “Humans often like physical interactions that are high intensity and for longer durations,” explained Ellis. “Many of our pet cats find this need for high social interaction distressing.”

Oh, and it gets worse! While we all know that looking after your cat is key, Ellis had a warning for those with pets living in an open-plan home. She claimed that failing to meet the needs of your pet could quickly lead to what she termed ‘chronic negative emotions, chronic negative stress, human directed aggression and house soiling’. Yikes.

Needless to say that the last thing any of us want is for our cats to be stressed or depressed. So, what should you do to make sure that you tackle this issue? Well, even if you already have an open-plan living space, there are some hacks that may well help. Here are a few things that you may want to try for yourself and your cat:

  • Invest in boxes and cat houses

Your kitty may not be able to hide away in a room, and so you need to give them another option. You can get plain old cardboard boxes or even a cat house for your pet. As you know, cats love to sit in boxes! These small things may just make all the difference because they give your pet a space of their own.

  • Use room dividers

We know that open-plan living is bad for your cat, so making things a tad less open could be the answer. Most home stores sell affordable room dividers that you can put anywhere in your home. Simply sectioning off some of the areas could be the answer.

  • Use the height of your home

If you’re lucky enough to have high ceilings in your home, you have to make use of them for the good of your cat. You may want to get some shelves that your kitty can climb on or even just a tall cat tree. If your pet feels that they can escape above the room, the open-plan living will stress them less. Genius!

Is Your Cat Misbehaving? Here’s How To Tell Your Cat No!

As cute and adorable as cats are, felines can often be very naughty at times. If your pet needs discipline, here’s how to tell your cat no.

how to tell your cat no
Michael Carian / Flickr

Let’s not beat around the bush here. Cats don’t like authority figures. They are ‘free spirits’ and they basically do whatever they want, when they want. Every cat owner knows the struggle of trying to get their kitty to listen to them. The problem is that often cats just don’t want to hear us when we tell them what to do. Luckily, we have all the details right here, right now. Here’s how to tell your cat no and actually make sure that they do as you say.

Use the command with a movement

Spoiler: Cats don’t understand English. I know that may come as a shock, but it’s a cold, hard fact. Saying the word ‘no’ over and over to your cat is not likely to make much difference to their behavior. The sooner you learn that, the better. You’re likely to have much more luck if you pair the command with a movement that you use each time.

Despite what you may have heard before now, cats can be trained. It will take a little time on your part, though, and so you need to prepare yourself for just that. Choose a movement that your cat can easily recognize such as a sharp wave or the like. When your kitty does something that you don’t like, use the command and movement together. It will take some time, but your pet will soon understand what you mean.

Move your cat away from the problem

What is your cat doing that’s wrong? If they are ruining something, like the sofa, you should pair your command with this action. You need to move them away from whatever the problem is. When it comes to how to tell your cat no, this is one of the most effective methods you can use. By carefully moving your kitty away from whatever they are doing, you will show them that they are in the wrong.

You will need some patience if you hope that this will work. You will basically need to keep repeating the same old action time and time again until your pet starts to understand what you don’t want them to do. Every single time that you see your cat head toward the object, get to them first. Pick them up and move them to another place in the room. It may be repetitive, but it’s the best way animals learn.

Try the spray gun tactic

The following tactic is somewhat controversial and whether you sue it is entirely up to you. If you wonder how to tell your cat no and teach them not to do something, here’s an easy option. For this one, you will need to get a spray gun and fill it up with water. Whenever you notice that your cat is doing something bad, you should tell them no and give them a little spray of water.

Now, this may seem cruel, but it’s not as terrible as it sounds. You see, the water does not hurt your cat at all, but they won’t like it. That means that when you spray them, they will stop what they are doing. If you use this tactic sparingly, you should find that your cat becomes conditioned and knows that whatever they are doing is wrong.

Clap your hands or hiss like a cat

In the wild, cats respond to sounds and loud noises. They don’t respond to voices. For that reason, when you’re thinking about how to tell your cat no, you might want to try clapping or hissing. These sounds act as warnings for your cats. When you start doing this, you will find that your kitty responds right away. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that it’s not exactly fun having to hiss at your cat all the time. No one wants to do that. For that reason, when you’re deciding how to tell your cat no, it may be worth considering some of the above options instead. As you can see, there are a load of ways you can get the job done so figure out what works for you.

Hint: Don’t bother shouting!

Finally, there’s one cardinal rule that you must never break! Don’t shout at your cat. For one thing, your kitty is unlikely to respond to this method. They won’t understand the so-called ‘angry’ tone of your voice. Plus, if you happen to shout louder and louder, you are just likely to scare them. That’s the very last thing you want or need. No matter how annoyed you are, try to avoid this at all costs.

Here’s How To Stop Your Cat Growling When They Are Upset

When you’re cat’s acting up and lashing out it can be nothing short of a nightmare. If you’re unsure what to do, here’s how to stop your cat growling.

stop your cat growling
A Hindi / Flickr

Most of the time, our kitties are adorable bundles of joy. They cuddle, purr, and play the days are way. Then there are the other times. You know the times that I mean. When they decide that something has annoyed them and they want you to know they are mad AF. The times when they don’t care about anything other than making a loud growl of pure anger. It’s frustrating and you may have wondered how to stop your cat growling before now. Well, here’s what you need to know.

1. Understand why your cat is growling

Of course, the very first thing that you will want to do is figure out why on earth your pet is mad. Growling is, unsurprisingly, a sign that something is not quite right with your animal. That’s a worrying thought, to say the least. You shouldn’t just focus on the symptom here (i.e. the growling itself), but instead the cause (what’s making your kitty growl). It’s not an easy thing to figure out. Cats can’t tell us how they’re feeling, and so we need to do a little detective work along the way.

Consider whether you’ve made any changes to your home or lifestyle. Are you out of the house more than you once were? Have you changed the living room setup? These may seem like small things but they could easily affect your cat’s mood. The truth of the matter is that cats see the home space as their territory. Any changes to that area could easily threaten them and change their natural mood. You should keep that in mind when tackling this issue.

2. Keep note of when your cat growls

If you’re struggling to figure out what your cat growls, you should try this handy tips. Many vets suggest that you keep a diary or journal of your cat’s behavior. When your kitty starts to growl, make a note of what’s happening around them. You may, for example, realize that your cat only makes this noise at dinner time or when a certain person is in the room. That means that you can work on pinpointing the issue so that you can deal with it in the quickest and easiest possible way.

3. Try to comfort them and relax them

Of course, one of the main things you will want to do when your kitty starts to growl is comfort them. This is a natural reaction. When your pet growls, they are letting you (and everyone around them!) know that things are not right. They may feel threatened or anxious. They may need something from you but not be certain of how to express themselves.

Either way, giving them a little extra love, support, and attention is sure to be the best way forward. Make sure that you take things slow and are tentative with your kitty. Show them your hand before you cuddle them so that they know they are safe. That way, you don’t run the risk of them attacking you because they are scared. You may indeed find that this method helps they to chill out. Sometimes, all our pets need is a little support.

4. Separate your cats from one another

If there’s another cat in the room, this is a whole different situation. Much of the time, felines find it hard to socialize with other animals. The reason is simple; they are territorial and want to take charge of the space in which they live. When you have two cats battling it out for the number one spot, they are sure to growl, hiss, and even fight. Yikes! Here are a few things that you may well want to try:

  • Separate the two cats in two different rooms
  • Ensure that they have separate eating stations
  • Show both cats equal amounts of attention
  • Make sure that they each have their own litter tray

The point is that when you have two cats, you need to treat them as separate beings. When it comes to how to stop your cat growling, the answer should be simple. Kitties don’t like to share, and so you shouldn’t make them.

5. Check out your cat’s body language

If none of the above has worked, you need to check out your cat’s body language. Your kitty is quite clearly stressed out and you need to figure out why sooner rather than later. Look for other signs of aggression (such as an arched back, pinned back ears, and widened eyes!) so you can see how your cat is feeling.

If this behavior continues, you may find that the best thing will be to take your cat to the vet. They will know how to stop your cat growling and will help you every single step of the way. What’s more, they will be able to detect any underlying issue that could be causing discomfort for your pet.

Revealed: 7 Signs of Cat Anxiety, Is Your Kitty Stressed Out?

If your kitty is acting a little odd, watch out for these telltale signs of cat anxiety

signs of cat anxiety
greyloch / flickr

No pet owner likes to think of their cat being stressed out or anxious. Typically, we tend to think of these as solely human traits, but that is not the case at all. Knowing the signs of cat anxiety is the best way that you can help your kitty! But wait, what if you don’t even know where to begin?

The truth of the matter is that many things can affect and show signs of cat anxiety in ways that we simply just don’t understand. For example, if you move something in their home or start feeding them a new brand of cat food, they may start to feel anxious. Of course, some cats are more susceptible to this emotion than others. If you want to keep your kitty content and happy, look out for these telltale signs of cat anxiety:

1. Digestive issues

Think about it. When humans are anxious, they often tend to suffer with stomach aches and digestive problems. Spoiler: Cats are no different. When your kitty starts to feel anxious, one of the major signs is that they will have either diarrhea or some other problem. It’s never a nice symptom to notice, but you have to keep an eye out for this one.

2. Constant grooming

We all know that cats love nothing more than to lick and groom themselves, but what about when this act becomes a little obsessive? If your pet is constantly grooming themselves all day and all night, it’s likely a sign of cat anxiety. Why? Well, you see, they are using the grooming ritual as a way to comfort themselves!

3. Appetite loss

Again, cats share many of the same traits as people do. When they feel nervous, they may lose their appetite or even stop eating altogether. Needless to say, if your cat won’t eat the food you give them, you should really take them to the vets sooner rather than later.

4. OTT meowing

Some cats are simply more vocal than others. If your kitty has always had a thing for meowing loudly, that is likely nothing to worry about. However, if your cat becomes more vocal overnight, there could be a dark reason. When cats are stressed, they tend to vocalize their woes. Don’t ignore this sign as it’s sure to get worse and worse.

5. Hiding away

It’s easy to see when a cat is healthy and happy. If your kitty is comfortable around you, they will sit near you and relax in your presence. That’s a seriously good sign. However, if your cat hides away from you all the time, it’s a cause for concern. This is a symptom of an animal that fears their environment.

6. Oversleeping

This next one is quite tricky since our lovely little kitties like to sleep much of the time anyway. Still, if you notice that your cat starts to sleep more and more, it could quite easily be a sign of cat anxiety. Be sure to keep an eye on them to see if their condition improves.

7. Aggression!

Finally, this is perhaps the most common sign of cat anxiety. When your pet starts to feel uncomfortable or stressed, they may lash out at you. They could become angrier and angrier for no real reason. Aggression is always a troubling sign and it’s honestly one that you must not ignore. Contact your vet and talk to them about what you should do next.